New Director to Chinese Campaign on Anti Corruption

China’s recent anti-corruption campaign is designed to add a point to any gap in China’s national security.

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The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) seems to be taking the worldly warning that Caesar's wife should be above suspicion. This is evident from the directives of CCP General Secretary Xi Jinping's anti-corruption campaign.

The CCP speculates that the chink in his armor are relatives of the cadre. The new guidelines issued by the CCP deal with the business interests of the officers' spouses, their children and spouses. The purpose is to limit the close families of the officers from taking advantage of the CCP principle for their own benefit. Authorities are expected to inform the party of their relatives' business activities, and withholding information could result in severe penalties. In March 2022, the CCP banned spouses and children of ministerial-level officials from holding real estate abroad or equity registered abroad. They will also be banned from opening accounts in foreign financial institutions.

Authorities are expected to inform the party of their relatives' business activities, and withholding information could result in severe penalties.

A statement from the CCP's mouthpiece, People's Daily, justified the new rules by saying that the party's goal is to serve the people and not special interest groups. Many high-ranking officials were helping their relatives to make illicit profits, tarnishing the party's image. At a June 17 meeting of the Politburo, Xi argued that while China was on the brink of "extreme" victory in the fight against corruption, more needed to be done to meet the challenge. He also said that time is needed to ensure that officials do not fall into the trap of corruption because they "do not dare, are not capable and do not want to".

The anti-corruption campaign may have been influenced by a number of factors. There is a growing awareness that high-profile bribery incidents provoke public anger and threaten political legitimacy. It has also been affected by events in other dictatorial regimes. A self-immolation by a vendor following a 2011 altercation with local officials in Tunisia has overthrown a two-decade-old one-party rule that has been fueled by corruption and high inflation. In Egypt and Libya, unrest erupted again with the overthrow of the one-party rule of Hosni Mubarak and Muammar Gaddafi. The incident sparked uprisings against Bashar al-Assad in Syria and sparked political turmoil in the Middle East. As an adaptive dictatorial regime, which constantly studies the developments in other autocratic states and recalculates survival strategies,

The self-immolation of a vendor after a 2011 altercation with local officials in Tunisia overthrew a two-decade-old one-party rule that was fueled by corruption and high inflation.

In particular, the new guidelines are being implemented ahead of the CCP's National Congress, which will see a change of government. While Xi is expected to get an unprecedented third term in office, the new leaders will fill the vacancies left by the incumbents.

Seeing the resentment against Xi in a section of the CCP due to the economic impact of the zero-quad strategy and the sudden eruption of political ambitions of some officials due to the extension of his tenure, such rules will affect the new elites. China.

Another factor that may have forced the CCP to tighten its screws on its misguided practices is its ongoing tensions with Western countries. Relatives of CCP officers are known to use offshore organizations to hold assets. The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists reports that Mao Zedong, Xi Jinping's brother-in-law, and relatives of former CCP General Secretary Hu Yaobang have been linked to offshore business activities managed by the law firm Mosaic Fonseca & Co. This makes the upper eyebrows in China insecure. For United States (US) sanctions. In light of the human rights violations in Xinjiang province and Hong Kong, the US has tried to freeze any assets of the CCP elites in the country. In recent times, Wang Chen, a member of the Politburo, and Chen Kwanguo, a former Xinjiang party leader, were in the fray. The new rules on probation for party members are a protective rail against the backdrop of more stringent US action in the future.

In light of the human rights violations in Xinjiang province and Hong Kong, the US has tried to freeze any assets of the CCP elites in the country.

Finally, and most importantly, what happened at the 2012 Party Congress seems to be a major factor in the new purity rules. After Chongqing Police Chief Wang Lijun informed Politburo member Bo Zhilai that his wife had a hand in the poisoning of United Kingdom (UK) businessman Neil Haywood, the dispute forced Wangla to seek refuge at the US Consulate in Chengdu. Since the United States and China were on relatively favorable terms, Wang was handed back to Chinese authorities. Media reports revealed that Haywood is a channel between Western corporates and the CCP power elite. But troubling for the CCP, media revelations linked Haywood to British intelligence, although the UK government denied he was working in the secret service. Relations between China and the United States have deteriorated in recent times. Xi warned that China is facing the most complex internal and external factors in its history, and that the challenges are "mutually and mutually active." The CCP fears that Western powers could bring about regime change in the nation. Against this background, there seems to be a significant reassessment of the CCP's ideology from looking at corruption as a net social evil. The concern is that in the case of Gu Kailai, human greed could give foreign intelligence agencies access to the interior of China's political system and destabilize it from within. The rules of probability for members thus seek to undermine China’s national security.

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